Biden Deserves Credit, Not Blame, for Afghanistan • For Two Decades, Americans Told One Lie After Another About What They Were Doing in Afghanistan • Afghan Crisis Must End America’s Empire of War, Corruption and Povert • Demand for ‘Moratorium on Drone Warfare’ Follows Latest US Killing of Afghan Civilians

 

Biden Deserves Credit, Not Blame, for Afghanistan by David Rothkopf (The Atlantic)

Former military officers and intelligence operatives, as well as commentators who had long been advocates of extending America’s presence in Afghanistan, railed against Biden’s artificial deadline. They all conveniently forgot that they were responsible for some of America’s biggest errors in this war and instead were incandescently self-righteous in their invective against the Biden administration.

 

 

For Two Decades, Americans Told One Lie After Another About What They Were Doing in Afghanistan by James Risen (The Intercept)

For two decades, Americans have told each other one lie after another about the war in Afghanistan. The lies have come from the White House, Congress, the State Department, the Pentagon, and the CIA, as well as from Hollywood, cable news pundits, journalists, and the broader culture.

Americans have hungered for a simple storyline, with heroes and villains, to make sense of the longest war in U.S. history. They have wanted stories like “12 Strong” to make them feel good. But at the very edge of the American empire, the war was nasty and brutish, and brought out in Americans the same imperial arrogance that doomed the U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

 

Demand for ‘Moratorium on Drone Warfare’ Follows Latest US Killing of Afghan Civilians by Jake Johnson (Common Dreams)

The largest Muslim civil rights organization in the United States demanded Monday that the Biden administration immediately put in place a “moratorium on drone warfare” after the U.S. killed at least 10 Afghan civilians—including half a dozen children—with an airstrike in Kabul over the weekend.

 

Afghan Crisis Must End America’s Empire of War, Corruption and Poverty by Medea Benjamin and Nicolas J. S. Davies (Common Dreams)

To read or listen to Western analysts, one would think that the United States and its allies’ 20-year war was a benign and beneficial effort to modernize the country, liberate Afghan women and provide healthcare, education and good jobs, and that this has all now been swept away by capitulation to the Taliban.

The reality is quite different, and not so hard to understand. The United States spent $2.26 trillion on its war in Afghanistan. Spending that kind of money in any country should have lifted most people out of poverty. But the vast bulk of those funds, about $1.5 trillion, went to absurd, stratospheric military spending to maintain the U.S. military occupation, drop over 80,000 bombs and missiles on Afghans, pay private contractors, and transport troops, weapons and military equipment back and forth around the world for 20 years.

 

Support our work with a tax-deductible donation. Or make it a monthly donation!

 

 

 

Share This